Withof
The most important characteristic of Withof is a flowing design. One motif comes out of another and the pattern is mostly floral.
The threads follow the curves of the pattern as in this scroll shown in Withof…Before and After.

The lace gives a three-dimensional suggestion because not only are the edges around each motif rolled but also the inside of the motif is accentuated by rolling as illustrated in this motif from Withof…Before and After.
   
Withof is mainly worked in cloth stitch showing the flowing line with here and there an area of half stitch to give shading and lightness. It is a very elegant, sober lace.
Floral Bedfordshire
Floral Beds is a highly decorative lace. This lace has a three-dimensional effect because of the way pairs are taken into motifs.
Plaits, picots, and tallies are often incorporated in Floral Bedfordshire lace. Dimensional effects are achieved by the addition of little decorations on top of motifs as shown in this motif from The Beauty of the Orient
Decorated Withof
Because of my interest in and working Floral Bedfordshire I started decorating Withof. I also made my own designs which were not flowing.
I used the Withof techniques and followed my own path. I started using other stitches which I share in Withof…Before and After.
   
I also worked several layers on top of each other. With my lace I try to create on my pillow the picture I make up in my head. I want my lace to be alive like this dragon from The Beauty of the Orient.
Combination of Techniques
My first experiment with the combination of lace and various embroidery techniques was a peacock. I was given a photo of an exquisite Chinese embroidered rooster which I slowly changed into a peacock, as I prefer the colours of a peacock.
The tail seemed perfect for Japanese embroidery but the eyes on the tail lent themselves to lace.

The tail seemed perfect for Japanese embroidery but the eyes on the tail lent themselves to lace. The head and neck were also worked in lace and embellishment with embroidery stitches.
   
The wing seemed ideal for Broderie de Marseille – an old French embroidery technique.
   
The resulting cape was a learning curve which showed me that lace can be successfully combined with other techniques.